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Академическое чтиво по магии - 1

Я тут через свою библиотеку вышла на одну базу данных, где по тэгу witchcraft мне выдали 158 академических статей на английском. К сожалению, их скачать можно только поштучно, и на все 158 у меня терпения не хватит просто ради удовольствия их скачать. Если кому-то интересны какие-то статьи, пишите номера - скачаю.

File: 1
1648. By: Schwarz, Frederic D.; American Heritage, May/Jun98, Vol. 49 Issue 3, p. 102, 2p, 1 Color Photograph; Presents information on the execution of Margaret Jones of Charlestown, Massachusetts for witchcraft on June 15, 1648. Pieces of evidence that led to the accusation; Information on an incident involving Jones' husband, Thomas; Statistics on witches that were executed in New England. (item 518759), Reading Level (Lexile): 1140
Database:
History Reference Center

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1696. American Heritage, Dec96, Vol. 47 Issue 8, p. 104, 2/3p; Focuses on the tragedies experienced in 1696 by judge Samuel Sewall who served in the proceedings of the Salem, Massachusetts witch trial in 1692, which condemned 20 people and two dogs to death. Sickness, deaths and accidents in the Seawall family; Birth of a stillborn son; Day of fasting and repentance declared by the state legislature to atone for the witch trial; Sewall's apologies and confessions. (item 9612190152), Reading Level (Lexile): 1180
Database:
History Reference Center

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A Case of Witchcraft/'Wicked Arts' (Book Review). By: Monter, William; Church History, Jun2000, Vol. 69 Issue 2, p. 432, 3p; Reviews two books about witchcraft. `A Case of Witchcraft; The Trial of Urbain Grandier,' by Robert Rapley; ``Wicked Arts': Witchcraft and Magic Trials in Southern Sweden, 1635-1754,' by Per Sorlin. (item 3209953), Reading Level (Lexile): 1490
Database:
History Reference Center

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A Royal Pardon for Witches? British Heritage, Mar2009, Vol. 30 Issue 1, p. 9, 1/3p; The article offers information on the petitions made by the government regarding witchcraft in Great Britain and Scotland. Both are petitioned for the royal pardon of witches. It was found that during the 16th and 17th centuries, approximately 400 people in England and 2,000 in Scotland were judicially executed for witchcraft. The 1735 Withcraft Act abolished the prosecution of witchcraft. (item 36119974)
Database:
History Reference Center

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A SABBATOF DEMONOLOGISTS: BASEL, 1431–1440. By: Bailey, Michael D. and Peters, Edward; Historian, Winter2003, Vol. 65 Issue 6, p. 1375, 22p; Explores then central role of the Council of Basel in France in defining witchcraft and spreading concern over it across Europe. Importance of Basel in the history of witchcraft and demonology: Emergence of the fully developed stereotype of diabolical witchcraft in Europe; List of demonologists at or near Basel during the period of 1431-1440. (item 11581146)
Database:
History Reference Center

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A Source-Book of Scottish Witchcraft. By: Goodare, Julian; Scottish Historical Review, Oct2007, Vol. 86,2 Issue 222, p. 338, 3p; The article reviews the book "A Source-Book of Scottish Witchcraft," by Christina Larner, Christopher H. Lee and Hugh V. McLachlan. (item 27888869)
Database:
History Reference Center

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Addendum. By: Cohen, John; History Today, Apr84, Vol. 34 Issue 4, p. 57, 2p; Presents several historical events around the world. Information on the Cabinet War Rooms used during the Second World War in Great Britain; Information on the Punch cartoons of Queen Victoria of Great Britain; Rise and fall of witchcraft from 1948 to 1984; Launching of the Historians' Press' first volume in England, London. (item 4863681)
Database:
History Reference Center

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ALAN MASSEY. Archaeology, Nov2002, Vol. 55 Issue 6, p. 72, 1p; Describes the contents of witch bottles, tools to protect a home from an evil spell or spirit during the late 17th and early-to-mid 18th centuries in Europe. Oddities and materials included in the mixture; Analysis made on a witch bottle; Description of the smell of the bottle's content. (item 7510950), Reading Level (Lexile): 1210
Database:
History Reference Center

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All Hallows' Eve. Early American Life, Oct2001, Vol. 32 Issue 5, p. 80, 1p; Focuses on the Halloween festival celebration. Root of the holiday; Symbols of witchcraft; Association of flames with the spirit. (item 5909191)
Database:
History Reference Center

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American Indians, Witchcraft, and Witch-hunting. By: Dennis, Matthew; OAH Magazine of History, Jul2003, Vol. 17 Issue 4, p. 21, 4p, 2 Diagrams; Analyzes the attitude of American Indians on witchcraft and witch-hunting during the seventeenth century. Impact of Indian supernaturalism and contemporary beliefs; Role of colonial representations of Indian witchcraft on native people; Role of religious practice on native peoples' health and prosperity. (item 10294750)
Database:
History Reference Center

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An Abundance of Witches: The Great Scottish Witch-Hunt. By: Normand, Lawrence; Scottish Historical Review, Oct2007, Vol. 86,2 Issue 222, p. 340, 3p; The article reviews the book "An Abundance of Witches: The Great Scottish Witch-Hunt," by P.G. Maxwell-Stuart. (item 27888870)
Database:
History Reference Center

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ARTICLES. By: Bailey, Michael D.; American Historical Review, Jun2006, Vol. 111 Issue 3, p. 950, 1/8p; A response by Michael D. Bailey to a letter to the editor about his article "The Disenchantment of Magic: Spells, Charms, and Superstition in Early European Witchcraft Literature," published in the April 2006 issue of the "American Historical Review" is presented. (item 21417733)
Database:
History Reference Center

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ARTICLES. By: Clay, Eugene; American Historical Review, Jun2006, Vol. 111 Issue 3, p. 950, 1/8p; A letter to the editor in response to the article "The Disenchantment of Magic: Spells, Charms, and Superstition in Early European Witchcraft Literature," by Michael D. Bailey, published in the April 2006 issue of the "American Historical Review," is presented. (item 21417732)
Database:
History Reference Center

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Battling Demons. Witchcraft, Heresy, and Reform in the Late Middle Ages (Book). By: Ferreiro, Alberto; Church History, Sep2004, Vol. 73 Issue 3, p. 691, 2p; Reviews the book "Battling Demons. Witchcraft, Heresy, and Reform in the Late Middle Ages," by Michael D. Bailey. (item 14404045), Reading Level (Lexile): 1300
Database:
History Reference Center

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Boning. By: Jackson, T.; Encyclopaedia of Aboriginal Australia, 1994, Vol. 1, p. 140, 2p; An encyclopedia entry about boning or bone-pointing is presented. Boning is a process of sorcery among Aboriginal people in Australia. The several forms of bone-pointing depend on the particular rite and the particular powers of the sorcerer. Some sorcerers use the bone to project some substance into the body of the victim or to draw energy from the victim. When a sorcerer buries the bone for a period of time, the victim will suffer fever and other symptoms. (item 28062866)
Database:
History Reference Center

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Book reviews: The Americas. By: Bush, Dave; Historian, Winter98, Vol. 60 Issue 2, p. 379, 2p; Reviews the book `Tituba, Reluctant Witch of Salem: Devilish Indians and Puritan Fantasies,' by Elaine G. Breslaw. (item 298419)
Database:
History Reference Center

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Bridging North and South: Inquisitorial Networks and Witchcraft Theory on the Eve of the Reformation. By: Herzig, Tamar; Journal of Early Modern History, 2008, Vol. 12 Issue 5, p. 361, 22p; This article reconstructs a network of Dominican inquisitors who facilitated the reception and adaptation of northern European demonological notions in the Italian peninsula. It focuses on the collaboration of Italian friars with Heinrich Kramer, the infamous Alsatian witch-hunter and author of the Malleus Maleficarum (1486). Drawing on newly-discovered archival sources as well as on published works from the early sixteenth century, it proposes that Italian inquisitors provided Kramer with information on local saintly figures and were, in turn, influenced by his views on witchcraft. Following their encounter with Kramer in 1499-1500, they came to regard witches as members of an organized diabolical sect, and were largely responsible for turning the Malleus into the focal point of the Italian debate over witch-hunting. I argue that Kramer's case attests to the important role of papal inquisitors before the Reformation in bridging the cultural and religious worlds south and north of the Alps. (item 36165932)
Database:
History Reference Center

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Britain's Last Witch. By: Gaskill, Malcolm; History Today, May2001, Vol. 51 Issue 5, p. 6, 2p, 3 Black and White Photographs; Profiles Helen Duncan, a materialization medium in England. Childhood and family life; Travels and seances; Results of tests run by psychical research societies; Details on the charges against her under the 1735 Witchcraft Act; Significance of her death in history. (item 4374758), Reading Level (Lexile): 1430
Database:
History Reference Center

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Burning questions: Widows, witches, and early modern European travel narratives of India. By: Banerjee, Pompa; Journal of Medieval & Early Modern Studies, Fall99, Vol. 29 Issue 3, p. 529, 33p; Examines the accounts of Europeans on the practice of sati, or widowburning in India. Failure of Europeans to link `sati' with the ceremonial burning of witches in Europe; Rhetorical structures in writings of Europeans regarding `sati.' (item 2398334)
Database:
History Reference Center

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Chapter 6: Shamans and Witches. By: Simmons, William S.; Spirit of the New England Tribes: Indian History & Folklore, 1620-1984, 1986, p. 91, 27p; Chapter 6 of the book "Spirit of the New England Tribes: Indian History & Folklore, 1620-1984," by William S. Simmons is presented. It discusses the existence of witchcraft in which the first record started in the 17th century. Witchcraft stories gained popularity in the early 20th century and declined in the 1930s. It observes that the fundamental practice of witchcraft are being practiced by folk healers which includes herbalism, curing and sorcery. (item 38708893)
Database:
History Reference Center

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CHAPTER NINE: Witches and Wives. By: Swatzler, David; Friend Among the Senecas, 2000, p. 196, 20p; Senecas and other Iroquois Indians, practicing witchcraft was equivalent to committing murder, and the victim's kin had the right and duty of retribution. In fact, it was not necessary to first hold a trial or obtains a confession before killing a witch, though such a formal procedure did often prevail. The fear of witchcraft was widespread among the Senecas. Illness, accidental injury, and death were often blamed on the malevolent power of a witch. Many people feared that some individuals had mastered the powers of witchcraft and used those powers against persons whom they viewed as enemies. Gender differences were prevalent among the Seneca Indians. Wife beating was a serious social problem. (item 12696219), Reading Level (Lexile): 1410
Database:
History Reference Center

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CHAPTER TEN: Visions, White Dogs, and Green Corn. By: Swatzler, David; Friend Among the Senecas, 2000, p. 216, 18p, 1 Black and White Photograph; Handsome Lake, a religious Seneca Indian, experienced his first vision in the midst of witchcraft prevailing the community. The spirits reminded Handsome Lake of his sins of drunkenness and profaning sacred songs by singing them while drunk. They insisted that he must repent and reform thoroughly, and refrain from ever drinking another drop of liquor. The four words — drunkenness, witchcraft, love charms, and abortion — summarized the sinful state from which Handsome Lake was being called upon to rescue his people. (item 12696220), Reading Level (Lexile): 1280
Database:
History Reference Center

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CHAPTER TWO: Henry Simmons Among the Senecas. By: Swatzler, David; Friend Among the Senecas, 2000, p. 27, 28p, 2 Black and White Photographs; About two months after Quaker missionary Henry Simmons moved into Cornplanter's village, he began to keep a journal. The first event that he recorded resembles an inquisition. On Sunday, February 2, 1799, a group of Allegany Seneca headmen summoned Simmons to Cornplanter's house. Simmons tried to turn the tables on his inquisitors — the nativists who distrusted European-American culture — by implicating them in the practice of witchcraft. The wicked people, who envied good people and sometimes killed them, were witches. Many Senecas of that era feared witchcraft and suspected others of practicing it. Regarding the comment about the mother of wickedness, it seems likely that Simmons was trying to force his own interpretation on the Indians, which was that they were living in a "dark and evil state" and had been living so for a very long time. (item 12696212), Reading Level (Lexile): 1280
Database:
History Reference Center

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Chocolate, Sex, and Disorderly Women in Late-Seventeenth- and Early-Eighteenth-Century Guatemala. By: Few, Martha; Ethnohistory, Fall2005, Vol. 52 Issue 4, p. 673, 15p; Chocolate, in the form of a hot chocolate beverage, was widely available to men and women of all ethnic and social groups in late-seventeenth and early-eighteenth-century Santiago de Guatemala, the capital city of colonial Central America. At the same time, chocolate acted as a central vehicle of women's ritual power, used as the basis for magical potions to cast supernatural illness, in sexual witchcraft practices, and even, at times, as a flash point for women's disorderly behavior in public settings. The gendered associations of chocolate with ritual power and disorder in Guatemala are considered within the broader context of the changing cultural uses and meanings of New World food products during European expansion in the Americas. (item 18577257)
Database:
History Reference Center

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Confess or Deny? What's a "Witch" to Do? By: Reis, Elizabeth; OAH Magazine of History, Jul2003, Vol. 17 Issue 4, p. 11, 5p, 2 Black and White Photographs, 1 Cartoon or Caricature; Analyzes why women are more accused of witchcraft than men. Definition of witch; Aspect of cosmic struggle between God and Satan; Link between womanhood, witchcraft, and interpretations of evil and sin; Impact of ministers' sermons about witchcraft; Highlights of Rebecca Eames's confession, and Rebecca Nurse's denial. (item 10294705)
Database:
History Reference Center

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Confessional Fictions and Demonology in Renaissance France. By: Krause, Virginia; Journal of Medieval & Early Modern Studies, Spring2005, Vol. 35 Issue 2, p. 327, 22p; The article focuses on literary works in Renaissance France. With his "De la demonomanie des sorciers," Jean Bodin attacks the skeptics of demonology as much as the legions of demons and execrable witches supposedly plotting universal destruction. These confessions tell of nocturnal assemblies where witches and demons are said to fornicate and dance naked, where members of an underground cult affirm and reaffirm their allegiance to the devil, where would-be plots are made and spells are cast, where children are sacrificed and then consumed in anthropophagous rituals. (item 16836322)
Database:
History Reference Center

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Confessional Fictions and Demonology in Renaissance France. By: Krause, Virginia; Journal of Medieval & Early Modern Studies, Spring2005, Vol. 35 Issue 2, p. 327, 22p; The article focuses on literary works in Renaissance France. With his "De la demonomanie des sorciers," Jean Bodin attacks the skeptics of demonology as much as the legions of demons and execrable witches supposedly plotting universal destruction. These confessions tell of nocturnal assemblies where witches and demons are said to fornicate and dance naked, where members of an underground cult affirm and reaffirm their allegiance to the devil, where would-be plots are made and spells are cast, where children are sacrificed and then consumed in anthropophagous rituals. (item 16871038)
Database:
History Reference Center

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CRIMES OF THE DREAM WORLD: FRENCH TRIALS OF DIOLA WITCHES IN COLONIAL SENEGAL. By: Baum, Robert M.; International Journal of African Historical Studies, 2004, Vol. 37 Issue 2, p. 201, 28p; The article examines the complex interplay of European and African ideas about witchcraft, cannibalism, and the particular difficulties of implementing a system of justice in the Casamance region of Senegal. It focuses on a series of trials, beginning in 1926, in which local French administrators believed they were prosecuting members of a secret cannibal society, while many Diola thought that the French were prosecuting witches. The author of the article demonstrates the difficulty of defining a crime, the consumption of human flesh, when there is no agreement between the participants as to what constitutes reality. (item 14495473), Reading Level (Lexile): 1210
Database:
History Reference Center

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Cunning Histories: Privileging Narratives in the Present. By: Cornish, Helen; History & Anthropology, Sep2005, Vol. 16 Issue 3, p. 363, 14p; Examining contemporary British witchcraft necessitates representing its historical context, currently a highly contested arena. Both magical practitioners and scholars have heavily critiqued the “orthodox” histories of unbroken lines of tradition reaching back to the distant past that were prevalent in the early to mid‐twentieth century. However, continuities of knowledge and skills based on the practices of rural cunning folk and folk magic continue to be mobilized by some practitioners as a way of connecting to ideas about the past, a narrative that is also critiqued by others. What is at stake is not only the conflicting foundational histories for contemporary witchcraft, but the ways in which the same textual and material evidence is deployed to substantiate competing accounts: they hinge on the ways evidence is contextualized. Interrogating “context” is not limited to the histories we aim to represent, but is embedded within anthropological writing and knowledge. (item 17886118)
Database:
History Reference Center

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Demonology at a Crossroads: The Visions of Ermine de Reims and the Image of the Devil on the Eve of the Great European Witch-Hunt. By: Campagne, Fabián Alejandro; Church History, Sep2011, Vol. 80 Issue 3, p. 467, 31p; From November 1, 1395, until August 25, 1396, Ermine de Reims, a peasant widow from Northern France, was systematically beaten and tortured by the devil almost every night. This is at least what the woman told her confessor, Jean le Graveur. This story takes place only thirty years before the formal beginning of the witchcraft repression in the Continent. For that reason I have opted to explore in this article a historical problem that lies at the very heart of the strange case of Ermine: the image of the devil on the eve of the great European witch-hunt. In particular, Jean le Graveur's narration can provide new evidence for assessing the continuities and ruptures between radical demonology and the previous theological conceptions of the devil. The overlap we find in Jean's manuscript between different traditions, contributes to demonstrate that the image of the devil that prevails in times of the early modern witchcraft persecution was not necessarily built in opposition to previous demonological paradigms. The new science of demons that began to emerge during the thirteenth century merely remarked certain traits of the devil of the Fathers, and therefore the differences between both mythologies arose from the decision of emphasizing different components of the very same demonological complex. The Satan of scholasticism, then, was not only an enhanced, revised and expanded version of the Augustinian devil, but the true consummation of the Patristic model, its fullest expression: one that would begin to emerge only at the end of time, on the eve of the Second Coming of Christ. (item 66337609)
Database:
History Reference Center

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Devils, Familiars and Spaniards: Spheres of Power and the Supernatural in the World of Seberina... By: Bankoff, Greg; Journal of Social History, Fall99, Vol. 33 Issue 1, p. 38, 19p; Presents information on the trial of Seberina Candelaria, a young woman from Bulacan, Philippines, who was accussed of associating with the Devil. Supernatural beliefs of a rural Tagalog community in the early nineteenth century; Height of witchcraft persecution; Concept of witchcraft both in western and indigenous society. (item 2247296), Reading Level (Lexile): 1710
Database:
History Reference Center

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Dissent and Debauchery: Women and the English Civil War. By: Jones, Alison and Dulay, Harjit and Cobley, Jennifer and Hammond, Joanne and Purcell, Lisa and Barlow, Laura; History Review, Dec2003, Issue 47, p. 9, 4p, 3 Black and White Photographs; Presents the results of a collaborative research project on women and the English Civil War. Emergence of a number of different radical religious sects; Inclusion of women as regular soldiers; Crimes committed by women; Participation of women in witchcraft. (item 11542757), Reading Level (Lexile): 1350
Database:
History Reference Center

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Enemies of God (Book Review). By: Walker, D.P.; American Historical Review, Oct82, Vol. 87 Issue 4, p. 1098, 2p; Reviews the book 'Enemies of God: The Witch-Hunt in Scotland,' by Christina Larner. (item 5616567)
Database:
History Reference Center

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Entertaining Satan (Book Review). By: Nissenbaum, Stephen; American Historical Review, Dec83, Vol. 88 Issue 5, p. 1316, 2p; Reviews the book 'Entertaining Satan: Witchcraft and the Culture of Early New England,' by John Putnam Demos. (item 5645136)
Database:
History Reference Center

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ENTERTAINING SATAN. By: Greven Jr., Philip; History & Theory, May1984, Vol. 23 Issue 2, p. 236, 16p; Reviews the book 'Entertaining Satan. Witchcraft and the Culture of Early New England,' by John Putman Demos. (item 4890916)
Database:
History Reference Center

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Escaping Salem: The Other Witch Hunt of 1692. By: Sinitiere, Phillip Luke; History Teacher, Nov2005, Vol. 39 Issue 1, p. 121, 3p; The article reviews the book "Escaping Salem: The Other Witch Hunt of 1692," by Richard Godbeer. (item 19347425)
Database:
History Reference Center

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Ethnographic Sorcery. By: Krige, Detlev; African Studies Quarterly, Fall2010, Vol. 12 Issue 1, p. 104, 1p; The article reviews the book "Ethnographic Sorcery," by Harry G. West. (item 67200126)
Database:
History Reference Center

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Europe's Inner Demons. By: Pearce, Robert; History Today, May2005, Vol. 55 Issue 5, p. 90, 1/4p, 1 Color Photograph; Reviews the book "Europe's Inner Demons," by Norman Cohn. (item 16989368), Reading Level (Lexile): 1270
Database:
History Reference Center

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Fall Semester 2003 Planning Guide. Junior Scholastic (Teacher's Edition), 9/1/2003, Vol. 106 Issue 1, p. T-7, 1p, 1 Chart; Presents information on issues that will be discussed in the Fall 2003 issues of the periodical 'Junior Scholastic.' (item 10639257)
Database:
History Reference Center

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Feasting on My Enemy: Images of Violence and Change in the New Guinea Highlands. By: Stewart, Pamela J. and Strathern, Andrew; Ethnohistory, Fall99, Vol. 46 Issue 4, p. 645, 25p, 1 Map; Examines the practice of violence through assault sorcery and cannibalistic witchcraft in the Highlands of Papua New Guinea. Ethnographic cases from the middle of 1960 to 1998 with colonial and postcolonial changes in the political economy; Gender issues on sorcery; Spread of malaria and the perceptions on witchcraft. (item 2542576)
Database:
History Reference Center

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Fine Wine & a Piss-Poor Vintage. By: Harrington, Spencer P.M.; Archaeology, Nov/Dec2000, Vol. 53 Issue 6, p. 24, 1p, 1 Color Photograph; Reports on the discovery of two corked 17th-century wine bottles in the Netherlands and England in 2000. Details on the bottle recovered from a sunken Dutch warship in the Wadden Sea; Information on the bottle from Reigate, England and its use in witchcraft between the 16th and 19th century. (item 3705820), Reading Level (Lexile): 1300
Database:
History Reference Center

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Fornicating with the Devil. By: Parker, Geoffrey; History Today, Oct80, Vol. 30 Issue 10, p. 55, 2/3p; Reviews the book 'The Witches' Advocate: Basque Witchcraft and the Spanish Inquisition (1609-1614),' by Gustav Henningsen. (item 4876598)
Database:
History Reference Center

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FRENCH AND ITALIAN WITCHCRAFT. By: Monter, E. William; History Today, Nov80, Vol. 30 Issue 11, p. 31, 5p, 5 Black and White Photographs, 1 Graph, 1 Map; Reports on witchcraft in France and Italy. Role of France in shaping the view of Europe on witchcraft; Connection between witchcraft and heresy; Number of executions of witches in Europe; Facts on the inquisition of witches in Italy. (item 4860409)
Database:
History Reference Center

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From Black Magic to Heresy: A Doctrinal Leap in the Pontificate of John XXII. By: Iribarren, Isabel; Church History, Mar2007, Vol. 76 Issue 1, p. 32, 29p; The article discusses the assimilation of practices of black magic into the crime of heresy, a doctrinal enterprise launched by Pope John XXII in 1320. It asserts that the pope sought the opinion of experts before taking a final decision that would entail extending the jurisdiction of the inquisition to cover cases of black magic. According to a study by Alain Boureau on medieval demonology, the question that truly concerned the pope was not witchcraft or ritual magic per se, but the role of the devil in these practices. (item 24277427), Reading Level (Lexile): 1660
Database:
History Reference Center

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Front and Back Covers, Volume 26, Number 2. April 2010. Anthropology Today, Apr2010, Vol. 26 Issue 2, p. i, 2p, 9 Color Photographs; Front cover caption, volume 26 issue 2 A positive, albeit anthropomorphized, view of badgers appears in this illustration for the original edition of the children's classic Wind in the willows. Badgers are shortly to be culled in north Pembrokeshire as part of a Welsh Assembly Government campaign against bovine TB. Pat Caplan's article in this issue discusses the arguments around the cull and the reasons behind the varying positions held by local people on this issue. Back cover caption Witchcraft and Child Sacrifice Above: a poster (supported by NGOs including Save the Children Uganda) against ‘child sacrifice’ in Uganda, a current topic of concern both to Ugandans and to anthropologists who have criticized media representations of this issue. Below: a Save the Children poster publicizing the main principles of the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child, signed by 191 countries. These rights include, among others, the rights to: be protected from being hurt or badly treated in any way; not be kidnapped or sold; be protected from being taken advantage of or exploited in any way; not be punished in a cruel or hurtful way. The article by Pat Caplan in this issue discusses a number of recent BBC broadcasts focused on allegations of witchcraft and child sacrifice, and asks what anthropologists have to offer in terms of understanding such topics. Caplan notes that they can not only contribute their knowledge of the occult in many societies, but also contextualize this realm in terms of historical processes and more material concerns. In addition, anthropologists can suggest links between apparently disparate issues and thereby go beyond surface manifestations. While anthropologists have no monopoly on truth claims, they can sometimes offer alternative explanations and show that things are not always the way they first seem. In order to play an effective role as public intellectuals in this regard, anthropologists need to be willing to grapple pro-actively with such matters of public concern, not least by engaging constructively with the media. (item 48787409)
Database:
History Reference Center

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Hall of Mirrors: Power, Witchcraft, and Caste in Colonial Mexico (Book). By: Norris, Jim; History: Reviews of New Books, Spring2004, Vol. 32 Issue 3, p. 100, 1/3p; Reviews the book "Hall of Mirrors: Power, Witchcraft and Caste in Colonial Mexico," by Laura A. Lewis. (item 13211977)
Database:
History Reference Center

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Hall of Mirrors: Power, Witchcraft, and Caste in Colonial Mexico. By: Bristol, Joan; Journal of Social History, Spring2005, Vol. 38 Issue 3, p. 793, 3p; Reviews the book "Hall of Mirrors: Power, Witchcraft, and Caste in Colonial Mexico," by Laura A. Lewis. (item 16733294)
Database:
History Reference Center

File: 48
Heartland of the Witchcraze: CENTRAL AND NORTHERN EUROPE. By: Midelfort, H.C. Erik; History Today, Feb81, Vol. 31 Issue 2, p. 27, 5p, 10 Black and White Photographs; Talks about witchcraze in central and northern Europe. Description of the execution of witches among German-speaking territories; Definition of witchcraft as a social offense in Germany; Reasons for fearing witchcraft by common folks in villages; Association of women to witchcraft. (item 4861294)
Database:
History Reference Center

File: 49
Heresy, Magic, and Witchcraft in Early Modern Europe. By: Basista, Jakub; Canadian Journal of History, Dec2005, Vol. 40 Issue 3, p. 497, 3p; The article reviews the book "Heresy, Magic, and Witchcraft in Early Modern Europe," by Gary K. Waite. (item 20657918), Reading Level (Lexile): 1320
Database:
History Reference Center

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Heresy, Magic, and Witchcraft in Early Modern Europe. By: Levack, Brian P.; Church History, Sep2005, Vol. 74 Issue 3, p. 614, 2p; The article reviews the book "Heresy, Magic, and Witchcraft in Early Modern Europe," by Gary K. Waite. (item 18390450), Reading Level (Lexile): 1520
Database:
History Reference Center

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Hexenprozesse in Deutschland (Book Review). By: Monter, E. William; American Historical Review, Dec82, Vol. 87 Issue 5, p. 1407, 2/3p; Reviews the book 'Hexenprozesse in Deutschland,' by Gerhard Schormann. (item 5637384)
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History Reference Center

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Hexenverfolgung in Bayern (Book Review). By: Nugent, Donald Chritopher; American Historical Review, Apr89, Vol. 94 Issue 2, p. 468, 2p; Reviews the book 'Hexenverfolgung in Bayern: Volksmagie, Glaubenseifer und Staatsrason in der fruhen Neuzeit,' by Wolfgang Behringer. (item 5648140)
Database:
History Reference Center

File: 53
Highroad to the Stake (Book Review). By: Monter, William; American Historical Review, Apr88, Vol. 93 Issue 2, p. 440, 3/4p; Reviews the book 'Highroad to the Stake: A Tale of Witchcraft,' by Michael Kunze and translated by William E. Yuill. (item 5660035)
Database:
History Reference Center

File: 54
Hopi Indian Witchcraft and Healing: On Good, Evil, and Gossip. By: Geertz, Armin W.; American Indian Quarterly, Summer2011, Vol. 35 Issue 3, p. 372, 22p; This essay presents the idea of evil in Hopi philosophy, with a particular focus on witchcraft, gossip, and healing. It is suggested that despite romantic notions of Hopi society held by Europeans and Americans, they must cope with the evil parts of human nature just like any other society. According to the author, ideas of witchcraft help to regulate social relations in Hopi society and to explain evil. Primitivism, medicine people, harmony, and social order are also discussed. (item 63154677), Reading Level (Lexile): 1120
Database:
History Reference Center

File: 55
"How could they believe that?": Explanation to Students Why Accusations of Witchcraft Made Good Sense in Seventeenth-Century New England. By: Godbeer, Richard; OAH Magazine of History, Jul2003, Vol. 17 Issue 4, p. 28, 4p, 2 Black and White Photographs; Explains why belief in witchcraft made sense in seventeenth century New England. Focus on cultural aspect of belief; Reflections of the hazards of an intensely insecure environment; Struggle between God and the Devil; Convergence of the mysterious and supernatural with things more tangible and personal in the accusations of witchcraft. (item 10294761)
Database:
History Reference Center

File: 56
Hunting the Witches. History & Methods of Torture, 2003, p. 57, 17p; Discusses key issues concerning witchcraft and the frequent use of torture to punish those who practice witchcraft. Historical background on the witch hunt; Use of the defense of the Roman Catholic faith as a reason for the witch hunts; Implications on studies of crime and crime prevention. INSETS: THE COMFORT OF THE DEVIL;THE DEVIL'S MARK. (item 9189769)
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History Reference Center

File: 57
I STAND HERE TODAY TO CLOSE THE EVIL PAST. Vital Speeches of the Day, Jan2013, Vol. 79 Issue 1, p. 020, 1/2p; The article presents a speech, "I Stand Here Today to Close the Evil Past," delivered by Uganda's President Yoweri Museveni at the National Jubilee Prayers in Kampala, Uganda on November 25, 2012 in which he offers a prayer to thank God for Uganda, to confess the sins of Ugandans, and to renounce the evil influence of idolatry and witchcraft. (item 84617828), Reading Level (Lexile): 920
Database:
History Reference Center

File: 58
In the Devil's Snare: The Salem Witchcraft Crisis of 1692 (Book). By: Salisbury, Neal; Journal of American History, Jun2004, Vol. 91 Issue 1, p. 201, 2p; Reviews the book "In the Devil's Snare: The Salem Witchcraft Crisis of 1692," by Mary Beth Norton. (item 13481707)
Database:
History Reference Center

File: 59
Instruments of Darkness: Witchcraft in England 1550-1750 (Book Review). By: Hughes, Anne; Labour History Review (Maney Publishing), Summer98, Vol. 63 Issue 2, p. 208, 3p; Reviews the book "Instruments of Darkness: Witchcraft in England 1550-1750," by James Sharpe. (item 4055263)
Database:
History Reference Center

File: 60
Interning the Serpent: Witchcraft, Religion and the Law on Montserrat in the 20th Century. By: Skinner, Jonathan; History & Anthropology, Jun2005, Vol. 16 Issue 2, p. 143, 23p, 3 Diagrams, 1 Chart; This article is an examination of the uneasy relationship between religion and witchcraft (the worship of the serpent/obeah) on the British colony of Montserrat in the Eastern Caribbean. It looks at obeah in the 20th century as practised by colonial British subjects and prohibited by British law imposed by British expatriates. Colonial governance is examined first through correspondence at the start of the 20th century, and then through newspaper archives and fieldwork reports and experiences throughout the century. The continued use of anti‐obeah laws by the British is shown to be an irrational but effective colonial technology of control. (item 17835199)
Database:
History Reference Center

File: 61
'It Is But an Olde Wytche Gonne': Prosecution and Execution for Witchcraft in Exeter, 1558-1610. By: STOYLE, MARK; History, Apr2011, Vol. 96 Issue 322, p. 129, 23p; Following the passage of legislation making witchcraft a capital crime during the mid-sixteenth century, magistrates across England found themselves under increasing pressure to investigate the activities of supposed 'witches'. The present article explores how the Justices of the Peace of one urban community - the city of Exeter - reacted to those pressures. The article shows that, in the immediate aftermath of the passage of the Elizabethan statute of 1563, the Exeter magistrates were still prepared to punish those who had been accused of witchcraft in the 'traditional' way - by simply banishing them from the city. Attitudes soon became harsher, however, and by 1581, at the very latest, the first execution of a convicted witch at the city gallows can be shown to have occurred. At least one further execution was to follow, in 1610, but - although these cases reveal that the hanging of supposed witches in the south-west began at least a century earlier than was previously thought - the evidence suggests that the Exeter JPs were generally more keen to restrain than to encourage the popular enthusiasm for witch-hunting. (item 59988835)
Database:
History Reference Center

File: 62
Judith Catchpole Trial: 1656. By: DiCanio, Teddi; Great American Trials, 2003, p. 8, 2p; The article discusses a court case wherein the defendant, Judith Catchpole, was charged of infanticide and witchcraft. In the case, a man identified as a the indentured servant of William Bramhall, told a story claiming that Catchpole have birth to a child that she murdered. Additional hearsay evidence noted that the manservant spoke of witchcraft committed by Catchpole. The jury launched an investigation which asked women to examine Catchpole for any signs of pregnancy and childbirth and found none. The court also disregarded the charges of witchcraft. (item 39251930)
Database:
History Reference Center

File: 63
Kupilikula: Governance and the Invisible Realm in Mozambique. By: Lubkemann, Stephen; International Journal of African Historical Studies, 2007, Vol. 40 Issue 2, p. 303, 5p; The article reviews the book "Kupilikula: Governance and the Invisible Realm in Mozambique," by Harry G. West. (item 27270613), Reading Level (Lexile): 1490
Database:
History Reference Center

File: 64
Madumo. A Man Bewitched - By Adam Ashforth. By: AMARA, RAMZI BEN; Journal of Religious History, Jun2011, Vol. 35 Issue 2, p. 274, 2p; A review of the book "Madumo: A Man Bewitched," by Adam Ashforth is presented. (item 60771229)
Database:
History Reference Center

File: 65
Magic, Astrology, and the Early American Religious Heritage, 1600-1760 (Book Review). By: Butler, Jon; American Historical Review, Apr79, Vol. 84 Issue 2, p. 317, 30p; Examines the survival of European occult or magical practices especially astrology, divination and witchcraft in American colonies during the period between 1600-1760. Role of magic and Christianity in controlling human events in colonial America; Consultation with occult practitioners of people seeking cure for body ailments; Widespread ownership of occult books in the colonies; Reasons for decline in occult religious practices. (item 5647971)
Database:
History Reference Center

File: 66
Making Magic. By: Adams, William Lee; Newsweek, 5/16/2005, Vol. 145 Issue 20, p. 12, 1/3p, 1 Color Photograph; Reports on the controversy surrounding the plan of the TV Land cable network to unveil a statue honoring the character Samantha Stevens from the television program "Bewitched" in Salem, Massachusetts. Concerns of Salem residents that the statue will belittle the serious subject of the 1692 Witch Trials which occurred in Salem. (item 16976485), Reading Level (Lexile): 930
Database:
History Reference Center

File: 67
Medicine and Anthropology in Twentieth Century Africa: Akan Medicine and Encounters with (Medical) Anthropology. By: KONADU, KWASI; African Studies Quarterly, Fall2008, Vol. 10 Issue 2/3, p. 45, 25p; Since the 1920s, there has been a foreground of fluctuating perspectives on indigenous African medicine and therapeutics in the medical anthropology of Africa. These circular perspectives in medical anthropology have stubbornly focused on the ubiquity of "witchcraft," the natural or supernatural basis of African therapeutics, integration between biomedicine and indigenous systems of healing, but have failed to excavate African perspectives on or the relevance of these issues in the background of African societies. This essay argues the failure to locate African perspectives on therapeutic matters that may or may not be important concerns in African societies is the quest for "ethnographic cases" that lend themselves to issues in the field of medical anthropology rather than African knowledge and perspectives of the field (i.e., Africa). The Bono, an Akan society of central Ghana, provides but one of many significant case studies in the encounter between African therapeutics and medical anthropology in the twentieth century, and an African perspective on the substance of those foregoing issues in the (medical) anthropology of Africa. (item 52222760)
Database:
History Reference Center

File: 68
Native Voices. By: Blaine, Martha Royce; American Indian Quarterly, Fall2000, Vol. 24 Issue 4, p. 615, 20p; Deals with witchcraft beliefs and experiences of Pawnee Indians. Actions of a practitioner within the tribe or by some person outside the tribe; Tales of dismemberment and cannibalism; Social constraints on witching; Belief in ability of witches to take animal forms. (item 4992650), Reading Level (Lexile): 1180
Database:
History Reference Center

File: 69
New light on the ‘Drummer of Tedworth’: conflicting narratives of witchcraft in Restoration England. By: Hunter, Michael; Historical Research, Aug2005, Vol. 78 Issue 201, p. 311, 43p; This article presents hitherto unpublished early texts concerning the ‘Drummer of Tedworth’, a poltergeist case that occurred in 1662–3 and became famous not least due to its promotion by Joseph Glanvill in his demonological work, Saducismus Triumphatus. The new documents show how responses to the events at Tedworth evolved from anxious piety on the part of their victim, John Mompesson, to confident apologetic by Glanvill, before they were further affected by the emergence of articulate scepticism about the case. (item 17518826)
Database:
History Reference Center

File: 70
Nocturnal Sects (Book Review). By: Evans, R.J.W.; History Today, Jul84, Vol. 34 Issue 7, p. 50, 2p; Reviews the book 'The Night Battles: Witchcraft and Agrarian Cults in the Sixteenth and Seventeenth Centuries,' by Carlo Ginzburg, translated by John and Anne Tedeschi. (item 4863502)
Database:
History Reference Center

File: 71
Punishment. By: P. R. W.; Encyclopaedia of Aboriginal Australia, 1994, Vol. 2, p. 906, 2p; An encyclopedia entry for the Australian Aboriginal punishment system is presented. Prior to white settlement, Aboriginal societies maintained their own systems of laws and punishments, built around the actions of Dreaming beings. The range of punishments included ridicule, swearing or growling at the offender, banishment or ostracism, the threat of supernatural intervention, the threat or use of sorcery, and physical violence. (item 28811748)
Database:
History Reference Center

File: 72
Raising the Stakes: Writing about Witchcraft on Wikipedia. By: Pollard, Elizabeth Ann; History Teacher, Nov2008, Vol. 42 Issue 1, p. 9, 16p; The article examines the relationship of academia with Wikipedia by exploring how an assignment helped students become better historians. The assignment for History 400W students require students to create Wikipedia entries on witchcraft and magic accusations from the Greco-Roman period through Colonial America. It describes the assignments completed by the students. Rubric-based assessment has revealed that the assignment has fulfilled student learning goals including researching and writing about a specific historical research. The analysis has also found that supervised student participation on Wikipedia fulfills these student learning goals. (item 35829645)
Database:
History Reference Center

File: 73
Reevaluating Tradition and Modernity in Latin American Vernacular Religions. By: Hale, Amy; Ethnohistory, Spring2006, Vol. 53 Issue 2, p. 419, 13p; The article reviews several books related to witchcraft, including "In Darkness and Secrecy: The Anthropology of Assault Sorcery and Witchcraft in Amazonia," edited by Neil Whitehead and Robin White, "Magical Writing in Salasaca: Literacy and Power in Highland Ecuador," by Peter Wogan, and "Witchcraft and Welfare: Spiritual Capital and the Business of Magic in Modern Puerto Rico," by Raquel Romberg. (item 20371746)
Database:
History Reference Center

File: 74
Salem Possessed (Book Review). By: Butler, John; Journal of Social History, Spring75, Vol. 8 Issue 3,; Reviews the book 'Salem Possessed: The Social Origins of Witchcraft,' by Paul Boyer and Stephen Nissenbaum. (item 5007580)
Database:
History Reference Center

File: 75
Salem Possessed (Book Review). By: Cowing, Cedric B.; American Historical Review, Dec75, Vol. 80 Issue 5, p. 1381, 2p; Reviews the book 'Salem Possessed: The Social Origins of Witchcraft,' by Paul Boyer and Stephen Nissenbaum. (item 5641962)
Database:
History Reference Center

File: 76
Salem Possessed (Book Review). By: Ekman, Richard H.; Canadian Historical Review, Sep76, Vol. 57 Issue 3, p. 331, 2p; Reviews the book 'Salem Possessed: The Social Origins of Witchcraft,' by Paul Boyer and Stephen Nissenbaum. (item 4698267)
Database:
History Reference Center

File: 77
Salem Witch Trials. Monkeyshines on America, Sep2002 U.S. Events Colony-1776, p. 25, 1p, 1 Map; Investigates the accusations of young girls regarding the use of witchcraft in Salem, Massachusetts. Beliefs in the existence of witches; Execution of suspected witches; Implementation of strict religious laws. (item 7367000), Reading Level (Lexile): 1060
Database:
History Reference Center

File: 78
SALEM WITCH TRIALS. Reader's Companion to American History, 1991, p. 961, 2p; The article discusses the trials of the Puritans who believe in witchcraft in Salem Village, Massachusetts. It has been found through the group of teenage girls who began experiencing prominent forms that led to the arrest of many villagers. In addition, due to questions on the reality of witchcraft, the government formed a new court which works under a stricter evidentiary guidelines. (item 27829408)
Database:
History Reference Center

File: 79
Salem Witchcraft Trials. By: Norton, Mary Beth; Reader's Companion to U.S. Women's History, 1998, p. 520, 2p; The article provides information on women who were accused of performing witchcraft during the colonial period. Although accusations spanned approximately the first century of English settlement in North America, about half were voiced during one ten-month period in 1692. This episode is commonly known as the Salem witchcraft crisis, although it began in Salem Village, Massachusetts, a small settlement on the outskirts of Salem Town and although most of the accused were from nearby Andover. The crisis began when a group of girls and young women connected to the household of the Reverend Samuel Parris began to suffer from convulsions and hysterical fits. A special court handled the trials and by the time prosecutions ceased in May 1693, twenty-six people had been convicted and nineteen executed by hanging. (item 12461904), Reading Level (Lexile): 1360
Database:
History Reference Center




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